Voters Back Range of Potential Biden Environment Policies by Comfortable Margins

  • (Getty Images / Morning Consult artwork by Samantha Elbouez)

    Requiring public companies to disclose emissions and increasing fuel economy standards are the most popular policy options, with about 3 in 5 voters supporting each.

  • Blocking federal permits for proposed energy and mining projects that would threaten vulnerable habitats is next on the list, with backing from 59 percent of voters.
  • Establishing a new, cross-agency Advanced Research Projects Agency (ARPA-C), focused on climate is lowest on the list, with support from just over half of voters and about a quarter saying they don’t know or have no opinion.

As a candidate, Joe Biden made climate action a central part of his campaign, and it is consequently no surprise that the swaths of Democrats who voted him into the White House supported such action. But does the partisan backing for his campaign pitches translate into broader support for the policy options confronting a President Biden upon his inauguration?

A new Morning Consult poll finds that indeed it does. Faced with a list of nine policy options that a Biden administration could take on the environment, at least half of registered voters were in support of all of them.

The most popular of these — requiring that public companies disclose climate risks and the greenhouse gas emissions from their operations and supply chains — garnered support from 63 percent of voters. Meanwhile, the least popular — establishing a new, cross-agency Advanced Research Projects Agency (ARPA-C), focused on climate — had the backing of 51 percent of the electorate, and 24 percent reported that they didn’t know or had no opinion on the somewhat wonky proposal. For all options, opposition hovered around a quarter of respondents.

Other options include increasing fuel economy standards for new vehicles, blocking federal permits for proposed energy and mining projects that would threaten vulnerable habitats, placing limits on methane emissions from oil and gas operations and making public investments in automobile infrastructure, including 500,000 electric vehicle charging stations. 01-19-21

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